lecture

Christoph Mayer, Eurovision Song Contest: A European Festival of Camp Culture

Christoph Mayer, Eurovision Song Contest: A European Festival of Camp Culture

Part of the University of Kentucky, College of Arts and Sciences' Year of Europe celebration.

In conjunction with:

Hispanic studies - hs.as.uky.edu Modern & Classical Languages, Literature & Cultures - mcl.as.uky.edu Jewish Studies - jewishstudies.as.uky.edu/ Musicology - finearts.uky.edu/music/

The Committee on Social Theory Presents: Richard Wolff

March 25th, Richard Wolff, Professor of Economics Emeritus, University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Visiting Professor, Graduate Program in International Affairs, The New School. Lecture will be held in the Young Library Auditorium, William T. Young Library. Reception to follow at 5:30 p.m. in the Gaines Center Commonwealth House.

"Capitalism vs Democracy: Facing/Solving the Contradiction."

 

 

Year of Europe - Andy Merrifield: Europe's New Urban Question

On September 9, 2015 at the University of Kentucky, esteemed writer, social theorist, and urban geographer Andy Merrifield, professor at the University of Cambridge, presented the kickoff lecture for A Year of Europe. Merrifield has taught at the University of Southampton, Kings College, London and Clark University in Massachusetts. He also has been a visiting scholar to many American universities such as Johns Hopkins, University of California at Los Angeles, and the City University of New York. He is an author of nine books, and numerous articles, essays, and reviews, which have appeared in The Times, The Nation, New Left Review, Adbusters, and Harvard Design Magazine, among many others.

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Leading Theoretical Physicist to Deliver van Winter Memorial Lecture

Physicist Juan Maldacena of the Institute for Advanced Study will visit the University of Kentucky Friday and will deliver the 2014 van Winter Memorial Lecture in Mathematical Physics.

Modern Genesis: The Amazing Story of our Cosmic Origins

Worsham Theater on the UK Campus Map

Presented by the Department of Physics & Astronomy, professor Sandra Faber of the University of California will speak on "Modern Gensis: The Amazing Story of our Cosmic Origins". Less than one hundred years ago, astronomers did not know about galaxies or that the Milky Way is a galaxy in a vast, frothy sea of galaxies. Today, astronomers have made remarkable progress in understanding how galaxies form in our expanding universe and the crucial role that they play in how the elements we are made of were built, and even how our planets and our solar system came to be.  This lecture will distill a century of dramatic cosmic discoveries to present a comprehensive yet digestible account of why we are here and where we are going...cosmically speaking.

Sandra Faber is a professor at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and the Interim Director of the UCO/Lick Observatory.  She is an observational astronomer with primary research interests in cosmology and galaxy formation. Some of her major discoveries include the first structural scaling law for galaxies (called the Faber-Jackson relation), the discovery of large-scale flow perturbations in the expansion of the universe, and the ubiquity of massive black holes at the centers of galaxies.  In 1984, she and three colleagues presented the first detailed treatment of galaxy formation based on “cold dark matter,” which has since become the standard paradigm for galaxy formation in the universe.  Faber was one of three astronomers who diagnosed the optical flaw in the Hubble Space Telescope, and she played a major role in its repair.  From 1994-2005 she was Principal Investigator of the DEIMOS spectrograph, a large optical multi-object spectrograph for the Keck telescope that is the most powerful instrument of its kind in the world.  She and colleagues used DEIMOS to conduct the DEEP redshift survey of the distant universe, which collected spectra of 50,000 distant galaxies and exploited the immense power of Keck to see and study galaxy formation 10 billion years back in time.  She now leads the CANDELS project, the largest project in the history of the Hubble Space Telescope, to extend our view of galaxy formation back nearly to the Big Bang.  In 2009, she was awarded the Bower Award for Achievement in Science from the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia, and in 2012 she received the Bruce Medal of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific and the Russell Prize of the American Astronomical Society, both for lifetime scientific achievement. Most recently, she received the National Medal of Science from President Obama in February 2013.

 

Date: 
Tuesday, August 27, 2013 - 7:00pm to 8:30pm
Location: 
Worsham Theater, UK Student Center

The 2012 Van Winter Memorial Lecture: Paul Steinhardt and Quasicrystals

Each year, the Department of Mathematics and the Department of Physics and Astronomy jointly organize the Van Winter Memorial Lecture, which brings in distinguished speakers to give lectures on matters of common interest to mathematicians and physicists.

This year's speaker is Paul Steinhardt, professor of physics and astrophysics at Princeton University, and director of the Princeton Center for Theoretical Sciences. In this podcast, we spoke to Sumit Das, who will be hosting the lecture, about some of professor Steinhardt's research.

Professor Steinhardt's lecture will be titled, "Once Upon a Time in Kamchatka: the Extraordinary Search for Natural Quasicrystals." The presentation will be on Friday, March 23, from 3:15 pm to 4:15 pm, in room 139 of the Chemistry-Physics building.

In short, a quasicrystal is a type of structure that shows rotational symmetry, but is not periodic -- it doesn't have a pattern that repeats over a distance. Quasicrystals can be composed of sets of a few shapes that are arranged to fill up a space, and although they may have radial patterns, these do not repeat around the crystal in any noticeable order. Usually, it has been thought that crystals can only have two-, four-, or six-sided radial patterns, but quasicrystals can have five-sided rotational symmetry as well, such as in these structures:

A Penrose tiling of thick and thin rhombi.An atomic model of fivefold icosahedral-Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystal surface.A Penrose tiling using thick and thin rhombi.

 

 

 

 

 

This podcast was produced by Stephen Gordinier.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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