kentucky skytalks

Kentucky SkyTalk

Date: 
Thursday, June 13, 2019 - 8:00pm
Location: 
JSB 121
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Kentucky SkyTalk

November 14, 2019 - Chem-Phys Building - Room 155 - 7:00 PM

Austin Hinkel - The Leftovers of Solar System Formation

Kentucky SkyTalk: Pandora’s Cluster: Abell 2744

The galaxy cluster Abell 2744 contains so many unusual phenomena that astronomers have dubbed it "Pandora's Cluster," after the mythological box said to contain all the world's ills. A galaxy cluster is a large scale structure that contains hundreds to thousands of gravitationally bound galaxies. When galaxy clusters collide they can release energies equivalent to 10,000 supernovae per year for one billion years. By studying these collisions, astronomers can study the behavior of dark matter by its interaction with normal matter.

 

Date: 
Thursday, February 9, 2017 - 7:00pm to 8:00pm
Location: 
CP155
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Kentucky SkyTalk: Keep Looking Up: The Heavenward Herschels

The Family Herschel, William, Caroline, and John, were the most productive astronomers of their times. They bridged the visual and photographic eras in astronomy, and catalogued thousands of faint, fuzzy objects in the night sky. To the Herschels we owe the terms “infrared,” “asteroid,” and “photography.” William wrote:

“I have looked further into space than ever human being did before me. I have observed stars of which the light, it can be proved, must take two million years to reach the earth.”

And so he did. In this SkyTalk we will visit the highlights of this remarkable family and sample modern images of what they saw in the eyepiece 200 years ago.

Date: 
Thursday, January 12, 2017 - 7:00pm to 8:00pm
Location: 
CP155
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Kentucky Sky Talk: The Heart of the Milky Way

 

 The Galactic Center is one of the most active research fields in modern astronomy. The most prominent feature in the galactic center is a supermassive black hole (SMBH). Due to its proximity, it has become a unique astrophysical laboratory to study the physics behind supermassive black holes and its surroundings.In this talk I will talk about the discovery of SMBH in the center of our galaxy and outline some of the most recent developments in the Galactic center research.

 

The University of Kentucky Department of Physics and Astronomy is pleased to welcome the public to our astronomical observatory. Part of our program of public outreach is a presentation on an interesting topic in astronomy followed by a visit to the observatory.  The Kentucky SkyTalk is held on the second Thursday of each month.  A 45 minute program on astronomy will begin at 8:00 PM in Room 155 of the Chemistry-Physics Building. After the presentation, you are invited to view the sky through our 20-inch telescope, weather permitting.

Free parking is available on the top floor of parking structure #2, next to the observatory. With the exception of paid parking, without a valid parking permit, leaving your vehicle somewhere other than next to the observatory will result in a parking citation.

All are welcome and there is no charge. Tell your neighbors. Bring your kids.

Weather Caveat: If the university closes for a weather emergency, the SkyTalk will be postponed and the observatory will not be open.

A SkyTalk flyer in pdf format, sky maps for April, and a link to a campus map are available here:  www.pa.uky.edu/observatory

Date: 
Thursday, July 14, 2016 - 8:00pm to 8:45pm
Location: 
CP155
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Kentucky SkyTalk: The Instability of Planetary Systems

  One of the oldest problems in physics asks the question: Is the solar system stable? This problem dates back to Isaac Newton, who showed that a single planet orbiting the Sun would follow an ellipse with the Sun at one focus. The problem becomes much more complicated when you consider the eight other planets, all exerting small gravitational perturbations on each body.

There is no analytical solution to this problem. This classical question has been revived with the discovery of multiple expoplanet systems, which will be discussed.

 

 The University of Kentucky Department of Physics and Astronomy is pleased to welcome the public to our astronomical observatory. Part of our program of public outreach is a presentation on an interesting topic in astronomy followed by a visit to the observatory.  The Kentucky SkyTalk is held on the second Thursday of each month.  A 45 minute program on astronomy will begin at 8:00 PM in Room 155 of the Chemistry-Physics Building. After the presentation, you are invited to view the sky through our 20-inch telescope, weather permitting.

Free parking is available on the top floor of parking structure #2, next to the observatory. With the exception of paid parking, without a valid parking permit, leaving your vehicle somewhere other than next to the observatory will result in a parking citation.

All are welcome and there is no charge. Tell your neighbors. Bring your kids.

Weather Caveat: If the university closes for a weather emergency, the SkyTalk will be postponed and the observatory will not be open.

A SkyTalk flyer in pdf format, sky maps for April, and a link to a campus map are available here:  www.pa.uky.edu/observatory

 

 

Date: 
Thursday, June 9, 2016 - 8:00pm to 8:45pm
Location: 
CP155
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Kentucky Sky Talk: Traveling Through the Orion Nebula

This Sky Talk will be given by Prof C. R. "Bob" O'Dell of Vanderbilt University.  Bob was the project scientist who guided the development and construction of the Hubble Space Telescope and used it to make groundbreaking studies of the Orion Nebula.  The program will consist of a 40 minute Japanese National Television (NHK) documentary on Bob, HST, and his studies of Orion, followed by a question and answer period in which he will answer audience queries.

 

The MacAdam Student Observatory staff are pleased to welcome the public to our facility. We present a program of public outreach on the second Thursday of every month.  A 40-minute presentation on astronomy will be held  in  the Chemistry-Physics Building, before moving across the street to the observatory, weather permitting. Note that the temperature at the telescope is the same as it is outside. The Observatory is located on Parking Structure #2 on the University of Kentucky campus on this map.)

Parking Note: Guests for the monthly SkyTalk that bring vehicles should plan on leaving them in Parking Structure #2, next to the observatory. Visitors that park elsewhere are subject to citation. Some streets near the observatory will be closed due to construction intermittently over the next few years. These include Rose Street and Alumni Drive. The recommended path to Parking Structure #2 is outlined in red, here: Directions with street closures.pdf.

Date: 
Thursday, September 10, 2015 - 8:00pm to 8:45pm
Location: 
CP139
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Kentucky Sky Talk: A History of Gravity: An Attractive Theory for 300 Years

 Isaac Newton proposed Universal Gravitation in 1687, when the Principia Mathematica was published. The notion that stars, planets and apples followed the same rules everywhere was, and remains, a novel idea. Newton's theory was suffi-cient until the middle of the 19th century when improved technology exposed inconsistencies. In 1915, Einstein advanced a theory that extended Newton's ideas of gravity. Since then, the most exquisitely subtle experiments have been performed to test Newton and Einstein. To the current limits of precision, these theories have been confirmed. But are they complete?

The University of Kentucky Department of Physics and Astronomy is pleased to welcome the public to our astronomical observatory. Part of our program of public outreach is a presentation on an interesting topic in astronomy followed by a visit to the observatory. The Kentucky SkyTalk is held on the second Thursday of every month.  A 45 minute program on astronomy will begin at 7:00 PM in Room 155 of the Chemistry-Physics Building. After the presentation, you are invited to view the sky through our 20-inch telescope, weather permitting.

 

Free parking is available on the top floor of parking structure #2, next to the observatory. With the exception of paid parking, without a valid parking permit, leaving your vehicle somewhere other than next to the observatory will result in a parking citation. Please note that Rose Street is closed south of the Chem-Physics building.

 

All are welcome and there is no charge. Tell your neighbors. Bring your kids.

 

A flyer in pdf format and a link to a campus map are available here:  https://pa.as.uky.edu/observatory

 

 

 

Date: 
Thursday, January 8, 2015 - 7:00pm to 7:45pm
Location: 
CP155
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Kentucky SkyTalks with Tim Knauer

Tim Knauer is a professor for the department of Physics and Astronomy, and the director of the MacAdam Student Observatory. Each month, he hosts the Kentucky SkyTalks, an ongoing series of discussions on the science of life and the universe.

This podcast was produced by Stephen Gordinier.

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