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International Youth Water Justice Summit

Join the U.K. Appalachian Center for the International Youth Water Justice Summit at Memorial Hall on Saturday, July 12th, 2014 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.  This event is free and open to the public; all ages are welcome to attend (children under the age of 16 must be accompanied by a parent or guardian). Lunch will be provided. There will be presentations and activities related to water justice locally, regionally, and globally throughout the day. Water justice refers to fair and inclusive distribution and stewardship of water resources. This is an opportunity to think about how you are connected to everyone in the world through water, from the make-up of the human body to the watersheds providing us with drinking water to the river, ocean, and weather systems that keep water circulating.

Here is the schedule for Saturday's events:

Just outside Memorial Hall (or in the lobby, if raining) will be these hands-on activities through the day:

9-5 Enviroscape (Bluegrass GreenSource)

11-2 Paint your watershed (KY Riverkeeper)

9-5 Meet a salamander (UK Forestry/Appalachian Center)

 

Inside Memorial Hall:

9:00-9:15 Welcome

9:15-10:00 Introduction to the Kentucky River Watershed by the KY Riverkeeper

10:00-11:00 Global discussion of water issues between those in Memorial Hall and young people joining us electronically from Morocco and Turkey

11:00AM-12:00PM Examples of community forestry/water management from Indonesia

12:00-1:00 Outside (weather permitting): lunch; inside: screening of the film THIRST

1:00-1:30 Panel/discussion: participants in the International Youth Water Justice Workshop in the Robinson Forest in Appalachian Kentucky, 7/7-11/14

1:30-2:00 Presentation/discussion: the state of global rivers

2:00-2:15 Break

2:15-2:45 Presentation/discussion: water crises close to home that have and have not made the news, and responses to them

2:45-3:00PM Movement/music

3:00-4:30 Kentucky examples of community-based watershed decision-making and monitoring: Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute

4:30-5:00 Closing discussion

A map for reference can be found here: http://www.uky.edu/pts/sites/www.uky.edu.pts/files/pdfs/ukpts-parking-map-summer-large.pdf. Parking closest to the event site of Memorial Hall includes the Rose Street Parking Structure #2 (located off of University Drive, with access from Hilltop Avenue), lots located off of Rose Street on Funkhouser Drive, and lots located between the Slone Building and the back of the Funkhouser Building off of Washington Avenue (via Gladstone). Please, see the construction plan map below and note that it is subject to change. It may be necessary to park in one of the alternate locations listed above.

For more information please contact Erin Norton, Department Manager at the UK Appalachian Center, 859-257-4852, erin.norton@uky.edu. To learn more in general about the UK Appalachian Center, you can visit our website at appalachiancenter.as.uky.edu/

Date: 
Saturday, July 12, 2014 - 9:00am to 5:00pm
Location: 
Memorial Hall

UK Community Encouraged to Get Involved at NCUR 2014

The National Conference on Undergraduate Research will bring nearly 4,000 additional students from across the country to the UK campus where they will present their research and creative endeavors while meeting other like-minded students.

Civil Rights Heroes Brought to Life at CORE Conference

Members of the public and especially young people are encouraged to attend "Aiming for New Heights," a celebration of the Lexington Congress on Racial Equality (CORE), the group of black and white individuals largely responsible for Kentucky’s civil rights movement.

CESL Helps Bring Ecuador to the 2013 Latino Festival de Lexington

Thanks to the efforts of the participants in the Go Teacher program through the Center for English as a Second Language, September 21, 2013 was an historic day for Ecuador. Thirty-eight dancers joined the activities of the Latino Festival de Lexington to share their culture and bring a small piece of Ecuador to Lexington.

Modern Genesis: The Amazing Story of our Cosmic Origins

Worsham Theater on the UK Campus Map

Presented by the Department of Physics & Astronomy, professor Sandra Faber of the University of California will speak on "Modern Gensis: The Amazing Story of our Cosmic Origins". Less than one hundred years ago, astronomers did not know about galaxies or that the Milky Way is a galaxy in a vast, frothy sea of galaxies. Today, astronomers have made remarkable progress in understanding how galaxies form in our expanding universe and the crucial role that they play in how the elements we are made of were built, and even how our planets and our solar system came to be.  This lecture will distill a century of dramatic cosmic discoveries to present a comprehensive yet digestible account of why we are here and where we are going...cosmically speaking.

Sandra Faber is a professor at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and the Interim Director of the UCO/Lick Observatory.  She is an observational astronomer with primary research interests in cosmology and galaxy formation. Some of her major discoveries include the first structural scaling law for galaxies (called the Faber-Jackson relation), the discovery of large-scale flow perturbations in the expansion of the universe, and the ubiquity of massive black holes at the centers of galaxies.  In 1984, she and three colleagues presented the first detailed treatment of galaxy formation based on “cold dark matter,” which has since become the standard paradigm for galaxy formation in the universe.  Faber was one of three astronomers who diagnosed the optical flaw in the Hubble Space Telescope, and she played a major role in its repair.  From 1994-2005 she was Principal Investigator of the DEIMOS spectrograph, a large optical multi-object spectrograph for the Keck telescope that is the most powerful instrument of its kind in the world.  She and colleagues used DEIMOS to conduct the DEEP redshift survey of the distant universe, which collected spectra of 50,000 distant galaxies and exploited the immense power of Keck to see and study galaxy formation 10 billion years back in time.  She now leads the CANDELS project, the largest project in the history of the Hubble Space Telescope, to extend our view of galaxy formation back nearly to the Big Bang.  In 2009, she was awarded the Bower Award for Achievement in Science from the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia, and in 2012 she received the Bruce Medal of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific and the Russell Prize of the American Astronomical Society, both for lifetime scientific achievement. Most recently, she received the National Medal of Science from President Obama in February 2013.

 

Date: 
Tuesday, August 27, 2013 - 7:00pm to 8:30pm
Location: 
Worsham Theater, UK Student Center

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