Featured Stories

TEAL Classroom Reinvents Introductory Physics at UK

In recent years, a new approach to teaching introductory physics has been making news, showing promising results and earning rave reviews from students. For some time we have wanted to try out this new approach, known as Technology Enabled Active Learning, or TEAL. Last year, we got our chance, following the construction of a special-purpose classroom. This is our biggest new initiative in undergraduate education in many years, and the results so far have been spectacular.

2nd Annual Postdoctoral Research Symposium to be held June 3rd

The Society of Postdoctoral Scholars at the University of Kentucky is hosting a symposium to feature the work of postdoctoral scholars in Kentucky and surrounding areas. The event will feature a keynote presentation by UK's Dr. Hollie Swanson, a professor in the College of Medicine's Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, oral presentations by Kentucky postdocs, a poster session and a panel discussion on interviewing techniques. 

Steven Yates Receives Funding from National Science Foundation and National Nuclear Security Administration

Steve Yates, a professor in the Departments of Chemistry and Physics & Astronomy and Director of the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory (UKAL), recently received two grants.  One of these awards [1] is a renewal of funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF), which extends continuous NSF funding of work at UKAL to greater than fifty years.  This research is focused on advancing our fundamental understanding of the atomic nucleus.  The nucleus, composed of protons and neutrons, is billions of times smaller than is visibl

Ferland Receives Kirwan Award; Mattacola Receives Sturgill Award

Two University of Kentucky faculty members were honored yesterday at the 2016 Provost Outstanding Teaching Awards ceremony with awards recognizing their outstanding contributions to teaching and scholarship at UK.

Some Intersections of Art and Science

“Some Intersections of Art and Science”

 Prof. Frank Wilczek, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

 Public lecture: Thursday, April 28, 7:30 pm, Memorial Hall 

Abstract: There are profound reasons, rooted in the nature of human cognition and perception, why art and science have a lot to offer one another.   I will display some important historical examples of their synergy, and point out some emerging opportunities.  Several striking images are an integral part of the presentation. 

Frank Wilczek is an American theoretical physicist, mathematician, and Nobel laureate.  He is the Herman Feshbach Professor of Physics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Along with David Gross and H. David Politzer, Wilczek was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics (2004) for the discovery of asymptotic freedom in the theory of strong interaction.

Wilczek's lecture is free and open to the general public.   A book signing will follow. 

This event is supported by the Departments of Physics and Astronomy, Mathematics, Statistics, Chemistry, the College of Engineering, the College of Arts and Sciences, the Graduate School, and the Vice President for Research.  The organizers thank the  Dr. J. C. Eaves Undergraduate Excellence Fund in Mathematics and  Milton Huffaker for their generous support. 

 

Date: 
Thursday, April 28, 2016 - 7:30pm to 8:30pm
Location: 
Memorial Hall
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